Exploring the Heavens – Week 3

The topic for this week was ‘The Characteristics of the Solar System’. The main items covered were the formation of the solar system, the planets and other celestial bodies such as comets and asteroids.

Due to being ill this week I attended the Thursday class instead of my usual Tuesday class, but the format was exactly the same. Paul’s 3D presentation was fantastic as it put us right in the middle of the solar system and we could experience it from many different angles and points of view, which really helped in developing our understanding of how it all works.

One of the main themes throughout this course has been the ‘ecliptic’ – a plane on which all the planets sit and orbit the Sun. Our solar system consists of our star – the Sun – an object which dominates our neighbourhood, consisting of 99% of the mass and also gravitationally. The 8 planets and countless comets and asteroids all belong to the Sun. The unit by which we measure the distance of the planets from the Sun is called an astronomical unit, and the Earth is 1 AU from the Sun (approx. 150m km). It is possible that the distances of all the planets from the Sun can be explained with a mathematical formula that proves they are not just random distances.

A sidereal period is the time it takes a planet to orbit the sun. The further the planet from the Sun the greater the period. Kepler’s third law – the law of periods – found a simple relationship between the distance and the period. The ratio of the average distance from the Sun cubed to the period squared is the same constant value for all planets.

kep8

His equation:

kep3

Our best guess at how our solar system was formed is called the Solar Nebula theory. Any theory has to explain the characteristics of our system:

  1. The order of the orbits of planets
  2. The categories of planets – terrestrial and jovian
  3. The amount of comets and asteroids
  4. Anomalies

formation

  1. Our solar system formed from the gravitational collapse of a large cloud of gas and dust
  2. As the cloud collapses, conservation of energy, momentum and angular momentum flatten it out into a disk
  3. The diffuse clouds end up as a spinning disk of gas and dust with the young protosun at the middle
  4. The spinning disk is hotter at the centre and colder on the outside, so closer in are more material of rock and iron, further out more hydrogen compounds such as methane, explaining the makeup of our planets
  5. Finally the Sun ignites and releases a strong solar wind to clear away the remaining dust other material. We are left with the planets we have now

We talked about all of the planets and their characteristics. When we were outside looking up we could clearly see Jupiter and Mars on the ecliptic. The signs of the Zodiac pass through the ecliptic. This is a good way to find a planet!

The synodic period is the time it takes for a planet to return to the same angle with respect to the Sun. The synodic period for Mars is 780 days for it to move from opposition to opposition. Prior to opposition is when the planets move in retrograde motion.

We had an amazing view of the Moon tonight through a telescope on the balcony at the observatory. This was my first time viewing the Moon through a telescope and it looked amazing, we could see so much detail. I can only imagine the view from the Moon looking back at Earth.

Moon

The Moon has a sidereal period (orbit) of 27.3 days and appears to go through its phases every 29.5 days (synodic period). The basis for our month. The phases of the Moon are due to the changing appearance relative to the Sun, however, we only ever see one side of the Moon as it has been locked in its orbit, due to the tidal effect from Earth.

The Moon is the major force behind tides on Earth. The gravity of the moon pulls the water  up towards it, creating an uneven distribution. The Earth and moon orbit a common centre of mass, located close to the surface of the Earth. As the Earth rotates on its axis each point on the surface is subjected to a sequence of high and low tides every 6 hours. These tides are also causing the moon to slowly drift further away from Earth at 3.7 cm per century.

Finally, we talked about eclipses, both solar and lunar. Paul said that we should all try to make it to a total solar eclipse, when the moon obscures the Sun. This happens when the 3 bodies are in exact alignment, which happens every 6 months or so. This phenomenon is possible because the Sun and Moon look the same size in the sky. The Sun is approx. 400x larger than the moon but is is 400x times further away, hence a total eclipse of the Sun is possible. Very few places on Earth will see a total eclipse due to the precision needed to make this happen.

Next week… The Stars!

5 Earth facts to celebrate Earth Day 2016

5. Earth is a terrestrial planet meaning it has these characteristics compared with Jovian planets:

  • Smaller size and mass
  • Higher density of rock and metal
  • Solid surface
  • Closer to the Sun
  • Warmer surface
  • Few moons
  • No rings

pale blue dot

4. Earth’s continents used to be one giant super-continent called Pangaea that existed around 200-300 million years ago.

pangea

3. Earth’s atmosphere is mainly nitrogen, followed by oxygen. So we breathe the second most abundant gas in our atmosphere.

2. If the Earth didn’t spin we would have nasty 200mph winds that blow from the tropics to the poles and back again. Our rotation, and the Coriolis effect, causes 3 convection cells per hemisphere that¬†diverts air flowing north-south to east-west. Air is transported from hotter regions to cooler regions.

coriolis

1. Earth’s atmosphere formed after the world was created. The 3 sources of our atmosphere are:

  • outgassing
  • evaporation
  • surface ejection

We got our deposits of gases and liquids during the era of heavy bombardment during which asteroids and comets brought gases to Earth in frozen form. These were then deposited into the body of the planet.

3e9cd53e4f977e71dba20239d9412286